Is there such a thing as a ‘male menopause’?

The “male menopause” (sometimes called the andropause) is an unhelpful term sometimes used in the media.

This label is misleading because it suggests the symptoms are the result of a sudden drop in testosterone in middle age, similar to what occurs in the female menopause. This is not true.

Although testosterone levels fall as men age, the decline is steady at less than 2% a year from around the age of 30 to 40, and this is unlikely to cause any problems in itself.

A testosterone deficiency that develops later in life, also known as late-onset hypogonadism, can sometimes be responsible for these symptoms, but in many cases the symptoms are nothing to do with hormones.

Male menopause differs from female menopause in several ways. For one thing, not all men experience it. For another, it doesn’t involve a complete shutdown of your reproductive organs. However, sexual complications may arise as a result of your lowered hormone levels.

Symptoms of Male Menopause

Male menopause can cause physical, sexual, and psychological problems. They typically worsen as you get older. They can include:

  • low energy
  • depression or sadness
  • decreased motivation
  • lowered self-confidence
  • difficulty concentrating
  • insomnia or difficulty sleeping
  • increased body fat
  • reduced muscle mass and feelings of physical weakness
  • gynecomastia, or development of breasts
  • decreased bone density
  • erectile dysfunction
  • reduced libido
  • infertility

You may also experience swollen or tender breasts, decreased testicle size, loss of body hair, or hot flashes. Low levels of testosterone associated with male menopause have also been linked to osteoporosis. This is a condition where your bones become weak and brittle. These are rare symptoms. They typically affect men at the same age as women entering menopaus

Changes in Testosterone Over the Years

Before you hit puberty, your testosterone levels are low. Then they increase as you sexually mature. Testosterone is the hormone that fuels typical changes involved in male puberty, such as:

  • growth of your muscle mass
  • growth of your body hair
  • lowering of your voice
  • changes in your sexual functioning.

As you age, your testosterone levels will typically begin to drop. Testosterone levels tend to decline an average of 1-2 percent per year after men turn 30. Some health conditions can cause earlier or more drastic declines in your testosterone levels.

Do I need hormone replacement therapy (HRT)?

Your GP may also order a blood test to measure your testosterone levels.

If the results suggest you have a testosterone deficiency, you may be referred to an endocrinologist, a specialist in hormone problems.

If the specialist confirms this diagnosis, you may be offered testosterone replacement to correct the hormone deficiency, which should relieve your symptoms.

This treatment may be either:

  • tablets
  • patches
  • gels
  • implants
  • injections

 

In order to check whether the symptoms you have are related to a decline in testosterone, Medcare is offering a Male Menopause check.

What is the Medcare Male Menopause check?

You will get the following-

  • Testosterone blood test
  • Blood pressure
  • Height and weight
  • Consultation

Only 69 euros

 

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Source – NHS